Picture Window Easter Egg

White rabbits are a common theme in Japanese art. Apparently, it comes from an ancient Japanese myth about rabbit that lives on the moon and makes mochi (Japanese rice cakes). The Japanese also adopted the Chinese zodiac in ancient times and according to that calender 2011 is the year of the hare. I’ve encountered a lot rabbit motif fabric in my search through the fat quarter bins at my local craft store. I bought some of this fabric earlier this year knowing it would be perfect for Easter.

The little rabbits on the fabric I got were perfect for a small picture window egg. I’ve seen picture window ornaments in various shapes and sizes throughout my kimekomi research. It’s a very common design. I was inspired by what I have seen others do but I came up with the “how-to” totally on my own. You can easily change the measurements to change the size and shape of your window.

Materials & Tools Needed:

  • ball point pen
  • tape measure
  • craft knife
  • tucking tool (I use a straight upholstery needle)
  • liquid whiteout
  • glue stick
  • smooth foam egg
  • cotton fabric, one with a rabbit theme and another complimentary pattern and color
  • 5mm sequins in the complimentary color of your choice
  • 1/4 inch sequin pins*
  • 15/0 clear iridescent seed beads*
  • 2 pearl topped corsage pins
  • 2 plum blossom sequins in the complimentary color of your choice

*Purchased from Cartwright’s

Basic Instructions:

  1. Divide your egg into 8 equal sections.
  2. Using your tape measure, measure the height of your egg from the top point to the bottom point. Divided the height by 2 to find the midpoint.
  3. Mark the midpoint on every other line.
  4. Divide your midpoint by 2 to find the quarter point.
  5. Mark the quarter point twice, once measured from the top and once from the bottom, on the lines without midpoint marks.
  6. Using your tape measure as a straight edge, connect the dots. Midpoints to quarter points, creating diamond shapes on 4 sides of the egg.
  7. White out the line in the center of each diamond.
  8. Cut foam along all remaining lines.
  9. Make a cutting pattern for your window fabric with tracing paper or clear vinyl.
  10. Cut out 4 panels of fabric, with your desired image at the center, using the cutting pattern.
  11. Spread glue on the foam, lay the fabric over the top and tuck in the edges. Do this for all 4 windows.
  12. Glue and tuck the second color of fabric onto the remaining exposed foam.
  13. Pin sequins along all the seams except for the seams along the midpoint lines.
  14. Pin a plum blossom sequin at the top and bottom of the egg with a peal topped corsage pin.

Sequin Swirls

It’s been a week since the biggest recorded earthquake in Japan’s history hit. I am extremely lucky to live outside the area that has been directly effected. I never lost power or water, and the only issues have been scheduled blackouts and irregular train service. So far these issues have had little effect on my daily life. Life is starting to feel normal again, aside from the occasional aftershock. So without further ado, here is my latest creation.

This idea came from a doodle pattern I used to draw all over my notebooks when I was in high school.

Materials & Tools Needed:

  • ball point pen
  • tape measure
  • craft knife
  • tucking tool (I use a straight upholstery needle)
  • glue stick
  • 14.5cm tall foam egg
  • navy blue and red cotton fabric
  • 5mm gold and silver hologram sequins*
  • 1/4 inch sequin pins*
  • 15/0 clear iridescent seed beads*

*Purchased from Cartwright’s

Basic Instructions:

  1. Draw 2 perpendicular lines circling your egg vertically, dividing it into 4 equal sections.
  2. Cut foam along lines.
  3. Glue and tuck fabric on each panel alternating colors red and blue.
  4. Pin sequins on top of the fabric in a random swirl pattern. I did half in gold swirls and the other half in silver.

If you are new to making kimekomi and sequin ornaments please visit the newbies page for more detail on cutting foam, tucking fabric and pinning sequins.

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JAPAN NEEDS YOUR HELP!

Please support the relief effort by donating to your local Red Cross.

American Red Cross
British Red Cross
Australian Red Cross

Argyle Egg

I take inspiration for my designs from all kinds of places. This design was inspired by a series of novels I’m currently reading. The Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon. It’s a historical romance about a woman who travels back in time and finds the love of her life in 18th century Scotland. I wanted to pay homage to a story that’s had me dreaming in tartan for the past several weeks. Argyle is a traditional Scottish pattern easily replicated on a kimekomi egg.

Tools and Materials Needed:

  • ball point pen
  • tape measure
  • craft knife
  • tucking tool (I use a straight upholstery needle)
  • strip of paper
  • liquid white out
  • glue stick
  • 14.5cm tall foam egg
  • purple, blue, black and white cotton fabric
  • 5mm pink and silver ribbon
  • 3/4 inch straight pins
  • 2 pearl topped corsage pins

Directions:

  1. Draw lines dividing the egg into 8 equal sections.
  2. Choose one line and mark 7 points on the line evenly spaced.
  3. Once all your points on the line are marked, use the strip of paper to copy the marks to all the other lines. If you did the Zigzag ornament you can use the same strip of marked paper for this ornament.
  4. Connect the dots in a diamond pattern (red lines).
  5. White out the vertical lines inside the diamonds.
  6. Cut all the remaining lines on your foam.
  7. Cut out the fabric using the patterns linked below. Just click on the PDF and then print. The color and number of pieces needed is written on the pattern.
  8. Argyle Fabric Patterns

  9. Glue the fabric over each diamond and tuck in the edges. You should end up with a color pattern like this:
  10. Pin the ribbon to the egg in a lattice pattern, over the fabric but not on the seams. It should look like this:
  11. Finish by adding 2 bows at the top of the egg.

If you like fiction and haven’t read this book yet I highly recommend you do. It’s one of my all time favorites. Or better yet… get the audiobook and listen to it while you make your own Argyle Egg. 🙂

Zigzags and Polka Dots Kimekomi Easter Egg

This is one of my favorite designs. I’m really excited to be sharing it with you. There were a lot of challenges in making this egg and I had to go through several versions before finding the one I really liked. In my opinion, the bright colored fabric is what makes this egg special. I tried it in pastels and I thought it was boring. The bright colors give it a cartoonish whimsical quality.

You will notice that I used a thin layer of quilt batting between the foam and the fabric to give the egg a nice softness. I made kimekomi ornaments long time before I stumbled upon this idea in Suess and Hewitt’s book Japanese Kimekomi. So it’s not absolutely necessary but I think it really adds something special. Another great thing about using batting is that it hides any imperfections in your foam shape. Even if your foam is a little banged up, the batting hides all those little dents and scratches.

I also suggest, especially if you are relatively new to kimekomi, that you use fabric that has a little bit of elasticity. I found it very difficult to tuck around the sharp corners of the zigzags.

Tools and Materials Needed:

  • ball point pen
  • drafting compass
  • tape measure
  • craft knife
  • tucking tool (I use a straight upholstery needle)
  • strip of paper
  • liquid white out
  • glue stick
  • 14.5cm tall foam egg
  • quilt batting
  • hot pink, bright yellow, light blue, and white cotton fabric
  • green metallic cord
  • 3/4 inch straight pins

Directions:

  1. Draw lines dividing the egg into 8 equal sections.
  2. Choose one line and mark 7 points on the line evenly spaced.
  3. Once all your points on the line are marked, use the strip of paper to copy the marks to all the other lines.
  4. Using your compass, draw a circle around the top of your egg at the 2nd mark from the top. Then draw another circle inside the first circle, about 1mm past the first mark from the top. Do the same on the bottom of egg. You have now drawn 2 rings at the top and bottom of your egg that are about 1.3cm thick.
  5. White out the vertical lines inside the top and bottom circle and inside the rings.
  6. Starting at the top of your egg, using your measuring tape as a straight edge, connect the dots as shown in the video to create the zigzag pattern.
  7. Again white out the original vertical lines so all you see is the zigzags.
  8. Cut all the remaining lines on your foam.
  9. Cut out your quilt batting using the patterns below. Just click on the photo and then print. The number of pieces needed is written on the pattern.
  10. Next, cut out the fabric using the following patterns. Just click and print like you did in the previous step. The number and colors of fabric are written on the patterns.
  11. Using the glue stick, glue down the batting and tuck the fabric over it as shown in the video.
  12. Tuck, pin and/or glue the green cord into the seams.

Alright, so… I’ll be the first to admit that I glossed over some of the finer details in those directions. I find it extremely difficult and very time consuming to write directions for most of my ornaments. Especially the more complicated and intricate ones. If there is anyone out there that enjoys writing technical stuff like that and would like to help me I would gladly accept the help. Just contact me at alyx@ornamentdesigns.com if you are interested.

Now… I need to go pay attention to my husband before he leaves me. 🙂